Michiganders demand answers on 2020 election, call out elected officials

by Summer Lane

Michigan voters are concerned and angry about the unanswered questions surrounding the 2020 presidential election, decrying reports of shocking fraud that occurred across the state and demanding that Michigan elected officials take their concerns seriously.

On Saturday, Michiganders attended a public meeting with Macomb County Clerk Anthony Forlini and laid out their grievances, even going so far as to read an excerpt from official Michigan election law, demanding an immediate canvass and audit of the 2020 presidential election.

The meeting, which was brought to Macomb County after months of requests from concerned citizens who wanted to ask questions of election officials pertaining to the integrity of the 2020 election, was also attended by Melissa Carone, a Republican and candidate for state representative in Michigan.

Carone is also a staunch supporter of President Trump and election integrity, noting that “if we don’t secure our elections, nothing else matters.” Additionally, Carone worked the polls in last year’s presidential election and later testified about the dubious tabulation process of Dominion voting machines during a hearing held by the Michigan House Oversight Committee.

Carone wrote the following about the Macomb County election meeting:

“Forlini stumbled through his initial presentation before taking questions from voters.  When Mellissa Carone was given an opportunity to speak she cited an excerpt from Michigan Election Law Act 116 168.870 “Board of canvassers; investigation of recount…’ Forlini’s response, as expected, was one of complete subversion.  Forlini stated it was the first time he had heard of such law, which was quickly disputed by many within the meeting, informing him that they had sent the law to him on several occasions with no response.  This was disappointing to the attendees at the meeting to say the least.   Many at the meeting, were reportedly upset that they were the ones informing their clerk on election law.  Several officials were derelict in their duties over the past year.”

Unsurprisingly, Macomb County is not the first county in Michigan to garner the spotlight for reports of election irregularities. In Antrim County in Northern Michigan, it was discovered in an audit conducted by the Allied Security Operations Group that 6,000 votes were switched over to President Trump on Nov. 5 – two days after election night.

A recent statement from President Trump, in which he mentions determinative results of audit investigations across the country, including Michigan.

Additionally, Michigan attorney Stefanie Lambert reported that there was evidence of voting machines being breached during the presidential election, pointing out that Dominion CEO “absolutely lied” when he said that the Dominion Voting Systems machines were not connected to the internet.

Evidence has been revealed by several audits, such as the Maricopa 2020 presidential election audit, as well as Mike Lindell’s Cyber Symposium in August, showing that Dominion voting machines did, in fact, have internet connection capabilities.

Further, President Donald Trump issued a statement last week decrying the egregious lack of election integrity in Michigan during the presidential election, citing 45,000 ballots that reportedly violated the Chain of Custody requirements in the state, as well as 289,866 absentee ballots that were sent to voters who did not request them.

Last month, the Election Integrity Force held a wildly successful and energetic rally at the Michigan state capitol in Lansing, calling for sweeping audits of the 2020 election. President Trump extoled the event as having “unbelievable spirit and knowledge of what went on in respect to voting and vote count in the 2020 Presidential election.”

The real question is, what’s next for Michigan? The pressure appears to be heavy on Michigan state election officials and lawmakers to kick-start statewide audits of contested Michigan counties that were fraught with allegations of fraudulent activity, like in Antrim County.

One thing is certainly clear: Michiganders aren’t happy with the shadow of doubt that has been cast over their state’s elections, and they are determined to get to the bottom of it.

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